GPA and Class Rank

As most public high schools in Texas, our students will receive their cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) and Class Rank this week.

Are these two variables important? Yes.

Are they the only variable colleges consider? No.

Does GPA/Class Rank predict future life success? Absolutely not.

As a reminder, Frisco ISD calculates GPA on a 5.0 scale with weighted GPA awarded to dual credit and Advanced Placement (AP/Pre-AP) courses. More information can be found in the Frisco ISD course guide. An example of how “weighting” plays out is below.

GPA.jpeg

4-year colleges screen applicants on an initial combination of GPA, class rank, and SAT score. These aren’t “absolutes,” but tend to be more true than not.

college

Keep in mind, college admissions consider a number of factors in their “holistic review.”

Holistic Review.jpeg

Many students fixate on certain colleges because of reputation or publicity of the school. Instead, we ask students to work backwards through four questions.

  • What career path do you want to pursue?
  • What colleges/programs are best for that path? (Hint: There are many.)
  •  What are those colleges/programs looking for from applicants?
  •  What goals in high school will help you meet those requirements?

So what should you do when you see your GPA and Class Rank?

Look at your performance. Pat yourself on the back for the things you are doing well. Identify ONE thing you can do better to improve your performance. No matter where we stand, we can always get better.

I don’t know what to think of my GPA. What should I do?

Come talk to Ms. Smith (your counselor). We can help you think through the four questions and look at your plan.

Lastly…

A degree or certification is a ticket to a career. A high school GPA and diploma is a ticket into a degree program. Many students (including myself) go to community college for two years and transfer to a four-year college to earn every degree they want. There are many paths to a student’s ultimate career goal. Work hard and keep a focus on improvement.

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